Archive for October, 2007

Information About Richard Crabb, One of the Englishmen Who Signed Thomas Pell’s Treaty on June 27, 1654

Please Visit the Historic Pelham Web SiteLocated at http://www.historicpelham.com/.Please Click Here for Index to All Blog Postings.This is the second in a series of four postings regarding four of the Englishmen who witnessed the signing of Thomas Pell’s treaty on June 27, 1654. For yesterday’s posting, which includes links to earlier postings dealing with the same topic, see Tuesday, October 30

Information About Henry Accorly, One of the Englishmen Who Signed Thomas Pell’s Treaty on June 27, 1654

Please Visit the Historic Pelham Web SiteLocated at http://www.historicpelham.com/.Please Click Here for Index to All Blog Postings.On June 27, 1654, Thomas Pell signed a “treaty” with local Native Americans acquiring the lands that became Pelham and surrounding areas. A copy of that treaty, said to be in Thomas Pell’s handwriting, exists. It is among the Pell family papers maintained by the Fort

Brief Genealogical Information Regarding Abigail Pell, Born in 1751, Who Married Samuel Lawrence of Eastchester

Please Visit the Historic Pelham Web SiteLocated at http://www.historicpelham.com/.Please Click Here for Index to All Blog Postings.Below is a brief excerpt from a book published in 1899. It reflects biographical data for Abigail Pell who was born in 1751 and married Samuel Lawrence of East Chester.”Samuel Lawrence was born in East Chester in 1751 and married Abigail Pell, who was born in East

Mystery: Why Would John Pell Travel to Porte Royall in Carolina in November 1671?

Please Visit the Historic Pelham Web SiteLocated at http://www.historicpelham.com/.Please Click Here for Index to All Blog Postings.Barely a year after he first arrived in America to claim his inheritance of the estate of his uncle, Thomas Pell, John Pell received a “pass” to travel from New York to Porte Royall in Carolina. There is no indication of the purpose of any such trip if he ever made

Request by Native Americans To Be Permitted to Retrieve Corn from John Pell’s Estate in the Manor of Pelham During King Philip’s War in 1676

Please Visit the Historic Pelham Web SiteLocated at http://www.historicpelham.com/.Please Click Here for Index to All Blog Postings.As the violence between settlers and Native Americans known as “King Philip’s War” loomed, local Native Americans made a plea to English authorities to be permitted to pass in canoes to collect a portion of the corn they had grown on lands belonging to John Pell,